Experience Design

  • organization
    Amphistyle
  • charge
    Create a new kind of diabetes management app
  • timeframe
    May 2010 to present
  • background
    Six years ago my cofounder and I set out to defy the clinical design norm by creating an app with a warm look and feel redolent of the worlds of relaxation and entertainment. Not only inviting, it's super-efficient — a circular control works for each step in the data entry a person with diabetes needs to do every day. With fun animations and sounds, it’s the quickest and pleasantest way to log data and stay healthy. I'll be posting process images shortly.
  • organization
    Metrodigi
  • charge
    Build an app for neonatal nurses in the developing world
  • timeframe
    2014–2015
  • background
    Global Strategies, a non-profit dedicated to maternal and infant healthcare in the developing world, commissioned a unique app from Metrodigi — part medical expert system, part dosage calculator, part nurses’ instructional guide. I led the creation of Noviguide, both as a UX designer and as the lead developer (responsible for 40% of commits). Capturing all the nuances of newborn medical protocol made this one of the most complex apps I have ever worked on — yet it looks like one of the simplest. Making the very hard look very easy is a core aim of any designer.
  • organization
    Ellucian
  • charge
    Help create the first learning platform for Competency-Based Education
  • timeframe
    2015–present
  • background
    Currently I work for Ellucian, the leading provider of higher-education software in the US and abroad, with roots going back 30 years. I focus on Ellucian’s newest offering, an innovative learning platform for Competency-Based Education called Brainstorm. I recently completed a visual redesign and have designed a number of new features, with many more on the way!
  • organization
    Metrodigi
  • charge
    Help Pearson add some digital awesome to its textbooks
  • timeframe
    2014–2015
  • background
    Interactivity can transform the educational experience. Beginning in 2014 I led the creation of hundreds of small interactives for Pearson, one of the largest higher-education publishers in the world, which had retained Metrodigi’s services. Digital maps, charts, and figures can offer much richer experiences than traditional static content by chunking it down in ways that would take up too much space on paper. The interactive shown lets students tackle the complexity of a data-rich world map by walking through datasets one layer at a time.
  • organization
    Blurb
  • charge
    Make book creation easier so more books get made
  • timeframe
    Spring 2012
  • background
    Blurb has a significant share of the market for printed photo books thanks to a variety of products targeted at different personas and project types. I worked on several, including this “Instabook” product helping people quickly turn digital memories on Facebook or Instagram into printed keepsakes. I added a “hopper” to facilitate photo selection (not seen here), hid tools not needed by most users behind a button for a more streamlined interface, and added an elementary cover creator to keep users busy during some server load-time. The result was a better experience that improved conversions and helped more people preserve digital photos in the more permanent form of a photo book.
  • organization
    Blurb
  • charge
    Reimagine an iPhone story-creation app for iPad
  • timeframe
    Second half of 2010
  • background
    I also worked on Blurb Mobile, an iOS app for weaving photos, videos, and audio into a short, shareable multimedia story. My main task was to adapt the iPhone version to the recently released iPad, soup to nuts. I needed to create a design for the larger form factor, while adhering to the basic architecture and visual style of the original app. I also did most of the engineering work for the iPad adaptation, as a true designer/developer. I was lucky to be able to try some more experimental interactions, such as an editing bar the user swiped vertically to enter and exit edit mode. With some coachmarks, it became an accepted part of the grammar and personality of the app.